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Online activism in the Middle East : political power and authoritarian governments from Egypt to Kuwait / Jon Nordenson.

By: Nordenson, Jon.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Library of modern Middle East studies: 191.Publisher: London ; New York : I.B. Tauris, 2017Description: xiv, 402 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781784537784; 1784537780.Subject(s): Facebook (Electronic resource) -- Political aspects -- Egypt | Facebook (Electronic resource) -- Political aspects -- Kuwait | Facebook (Electronic resource) -- Political aspects -- Egypt | Facebook (Electronic resource) -- Political aspects -- Kuwait | Facebook (Electronic resource) | 2000-2099 | Online social networks -- Political aspects -- Egypt | Online social networks -- Political aspects -- Kuwait | Internet and activism -- Egypt | Internet and activism -- Kuwait | Protest movements -- Egypt -- History -- 21st century | Protest movements -- Kuwait -- History -- 21st century | Revolutions -- Middle East | Internet and activism | Protest movements | Revolutions | Egypt | Kuwait | Middle EastGenre/Form: History.
Contents:
Introduction -- How should we understand online activism? -- How should we study online activism? -- The Egyptian case: the context, the issue, and my findings -- The Kuwaiti case: the context, the issue, and my findings -- Comparing the cases -- Assessing the campaigns -- Understanding online activism -- Online activism in Egypt and Kuwait: conclusions.
Summary: Does the internet facilitate social and political change, or even democratization, in the Middle East? Despite existing research on this subject, there is still no consensus on the importance of social media and online platforms, or on how we are to understand their influence. This book provides empirical analysis of the day-to-day use of online platforms by activists in Egypt and Kuwait. The research evaluates the importance of online platforms for effecting change and establishes a specific framework for doing so. Egypt and Kuwait were chosen because, since the mid-2000s, they have been the most prominent Arab countries in terms of online and offline activism. In the context of Kuwait, Jon Nordenson examines the oppositional youth groups who fought for a constitutional, democratic monarchy in the emirate. In Egypt, focus surrounds the groups and organizations working against sexual violence and sexual harassment. This book shows how and why online platforms are used by activists and identifies the crucial features of successful online campaigns. Egypt and Kuwait are revealed to be authoritarian contexts but where the challenges and possibilities faced by activists are quite different. The comparative nature of this research therefore exposes the context-specific usage of online platforms, separating this from the more general features of online activism. Nordenson demonstrates the power of online activism to create an essential 'counterpublic' that can challenge an authoritarian state and enable excluded groups to fight in ways that are far more difficult to suppress than a demonstration.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
كتب كتب Emirates Diplomatic Academy’s Library
HM742 .N67 2017 (Browse shelf) Available 123456789

Includes bibliographical references (p. 328-389) and index.

Introduction -- How should we understand online activism? -- How should we study online activism? -- The Egyptian case: the context, the issue, and my findings -- The Kuwaiti case: the context, the issue, and my findings -- Comparing the cases -- Assessing the campaigns -- Understanding online activism -- Online activism in Egypt and Kuwait: conclusions.

Does the internet facilitate social and political change, or even democratization, in the Middle East? Despite existing research on this subject, there is still no consensus on the importance of social media and online platforms, or on how we are to understand their influence. This book provides empirical analysis of the day-to-day use of online platforms by activists in Egypt and Kuwait. The research evaluates the importance of online platforms for effecting change and establishes a specific framework for doing so. Egypt and Kuwait were chosen because, since the mid-2000s, they have been the most prominent Arab countries in terms of online and offline activism. In the context of Kuwait, Jon Nordenson examines the oppositional youth groups who fought for a constitutional, democratic monarchy in the emirate. In Egypt, focus surrounds the groups and organizations working against sexual violence and sexual harassment. This book shows how and why online platforms are used by activists and identifies the crucial features of successful online campaigns. Egypt and Kuwait are revealed to be authoritarian contexts but where the challenges and possibilities faced by activists are quite different. The comparative nature of this research therefore exposes the context-specific usage of online platforms, separating this from the more general features of online activism. Nordenson demonstrates the power of online activism to create an essential 'counterpublic' that can challenge an authoritarian state and enable excluded groups to fight in ways that are far more difficult to suppress than a demonstration.

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